HOM Videos: Trailer of Ep. 1, William E. Connolly and the Politics of Mimesis

The HOM Project is pleased to announce a series of video interviews on the contemporary relevance of mimesis. In ep. 1, PI  Nidesh Lawtoo meets political theorist William E. Connolly to talk about the dangers of mimetic contagion in the age of Aspirational Fascism. Check out the trailer:

Jean-Luc Nancy’s Lecture: “Bonheur du jour” (Dec. 6, 2018)

The HOM project, in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts (English Literature; MDRN), is happy to announce a Lecture by Jean Luc Nancy titled, “Bonheur du jour” on Thursday, December 6, at 6 pm ( New Location: SI 00.28, Mgr. Sencie Instituut. Erasmusplein, 2, 3000 Leuven; the address on the poster below is no longer valid!!). For more details & registration see:  https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/english-literature/events/lecture-bonheur-du-jour-by-jean-luc-nancy

 

HOM Workshop with Jean-Luc Nancy (Dec. 7, 2018)

The HOM Project is happy to announce a workshop with Jean-Luc Nancy on December 7, 2018. The goal of the workshop is to revisit an untimely essay, titled Le mythe nazi (1981; written with Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe), in light of the recent return of neo-fascist leaders–both in Europe and in the US–who are currently turning the political into a fiction. Registration: https://hiw.kuleuven.be/hua/events/agenda/homworkshop-nancy

 

 

Homo Mimeticus: Theory and Criticism HOM

 

Mimesis is one of the most influential concepts in Western thought. Originally invoked to define humans as the “most imitative” creatures in classical antiquity, mimēsis (imitation) has recently been at the center of theoretical debates in the humanities, social sciences, and the neurosciences concerning the role of “mimicry,” “identification,” “contagion,” and “mirror neurons” in the formation of subjectivity. And yet, despite the growing confirmations that imitation is constitutive of human behavior, mimesis still tends to be confined to the sphere of realistic representation.

The ERC Starting Grant HOM project, hosted by the Institute of Philosophy at KU Leuven, combines approaches that are usually split in different areas of disciplinary specialization to provide a correction to this tendency. In the process its aim is to contribute to bringing discourses on imitation up-to-date with the fast-changing transformations of Homo mimeticus in the twenty-first century.