Homo Mimeticus: A New Theory of Imitation–BOOK LAUNCH (Fri. Nov. 18, 4 pm CET, hybrid)

Featured

5 years ago the HOM project promised a new theory of imitation to face some of the main challenges of the present. Here it is, with Leuven UP! In this book launch, HOM/GM team members Niki Hadikoesoemo, Marina García-Granero and Giulia Rignano talk with Nidesh Lawtoo about the main insights and takeaways of Homo Mimeticus: A New Theory of Imitation (Freely available Open Access here). All are welcome, reception to follow, and on hybrid mode More information including Zoom link here.

MET Seminar 2: Biomimicry Revolution (with Henry Dicks)

Image

Dr. Henry Dicks contributes to mimetic studies from the revolutionary perspective of biomimicry. Drawing on his forthcoming book The Biomimicry Revolution (Columbia UP, 2022). Dicks provides new philosophical foundations to rethink nature as a model, as an inspiration for measure, and as a mentor. Video available here.

Metamorphoses Seminar: Introducing Mimetic Studies

If it is true that humans are mimetic animals (or homo mimeticus), and if it is true that we are entering an epoch of catastrophic transformations (or Anthropocene), which metamorphoses do we want to promote to affirm survival in the present and future? Mimetic studies should have a role to play in charting metamorphoses for the future. More information available here.

HOM Videos, ep. 7, Mimesis, Sport, Crowds: Gunter Gebauer

In this seventh episode of HOM videos, German philosopher Gunter Gebauer (Free U of Berlin) discusses the role mimesis plays in sports, the origins of language, social distinction, crowd behavior, and the recent rise of hypermimetic behavior in the digital age, all of which paint a picture of homo mimeticus beyond good and evil.

The Mimetic Condition

The articles in this special issue offer powerful transdisciplinary testimony to the rich potential of the contemporary return to mimesis, and in doing so suggest ways in which the mimetic turn and the post-literary turn may be understood as critically supplementing each other. In this short accompanying video Guest Editor Nidesh Lawtoo offers a foretaste of what readers can expect.

Keynote Dialogue btw Jane Bennett & Nidesh Lawtoo: From Homo MImeticus to Trans-Specied Mimesis

In this dialogue, Jane Bennett and Nidesh Lawtoo experiment with a mimetic genre to reflect on the vibrant interplay of human and nonhuman forms of communication. What style of language best approximates this mimetic entanglement? What role do non-verbal mimicry and gesture play in the birth of homo mimeticus? These are some of the questions on trans-specied mimesis the dialogue seeks to explore by going beyond nature and culture in the heterogeneous company of Nietzsche, mirroring bodies, and middle verbs.

Keynote II: Narrative as Body (Vittorio Gallese)

When navigating the parallel world of fictional narrative, we basically rely on the same brain-body resources shaped by our relation to mundane reality, since both realms are characterized by similar social practices and performative acts. Cognitive narratology reveals that readers make sense of complex narratives by relying on very few textual or discourse cues.

KEYNOTE 1. Plato on Facebook (Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen)

In Keynote 1 for the Mimetic Turn, Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen reloads Plato’s critique of mimesis for the digital age by restaging the following dialogue:

Socrates : Of the many excellences which I perceive in the order of our state, there is none which upon reflection pleases me better than the rule about Internet.

Glaucon : To what do you refer ?

Socrates : To our refusal to admit the memetic kind of media, for it certainly ought not to be received … Speaking in confidence, for you will not denounce me to Facebook and the rest of the memetic networks, all memes are made to contaminate the thinking (dianoia) of the hearers, unless as an antidote (pharmakon) they possess the knowledge of the true nature of the originals.